ⓘ Lichtenstein Castle (Graubunden)

                                     

ⓘ Lichtenstein Castle (Graubunden)

The Lichtenstein family first appears in a document in Chur in 1180. The castle was probably already built at this time, though it first appears in a record in 1396. In the late 12th or early 13th century another branch, the Haldenstein family, built nearby Haldenstein Castle. Through the 13th century the Lichtenstein family was often mentioned in records. In 1271, the Bishop of Chur and the Abbot of Pfafers Abbey stayed at Ulrich von Lichtensteins home in Chur. On 22 March 1275 Ulrich died as the last male heir of the family. A relative, Canon Rudolph von Lichtenstein, outlived Ulrich but was last mentioned in 1282. The Lichtenstein lands were inherited by the Haldenstein family. The youngest of four Haldenstein brothers was named Lichtenstein von Haldenstein in the late 14th century. The male line of the Haldenstein family ended when Ulrich IV died at the Battle of Nafels in 1388. His lands were inherited by a number of relatives, but by 1424 the Herrschaft of Haldenstein was owned by Ursula von Hohenems and her husband Peter von Grifensee.

The castle was probably abandoned in the 15th century, although there was a village of Liechtenstein, which was mentioned in 1479. By the mid-16th century the castle fell into disrepair and collapsed. While the vineyards of bundner Wirren, in 1662, perhaps, the castle was occupied by 200 men under the command of Colonel Baldrion. However, after three days, their provisions and water were exhausted, and they left the ruins of the castle.

In the 20th century, the ruins were cleaned and repaired.